2016-2019
Four Years of the Yellowknife Night Sky

What am I looking at?

These are 'keograms' - a visualization of an entire night from sunset to sunrise, read like a sentence from left to right. You can spot cloudy nights, nights with a bright moon, and nights with aurora activity.

Aurora moving overhead from the north
Auroral substorm fills the sky
Less common red aurora!
Obscuring clouds forming
Bright moon in the south
Mix of cloud, moon, aurora
Aurora at dawn

Below each keogram is a bar that shows the Kp-index throughout the night. It is a measure of geomagnetic activity. The more greomagnetic activity, the greater the chance of seeing the aurora. A Kp of 5 or higher is considered storm-level.

Kp0
quiet
Kp1
quiet
Kp2
quiet
Kp3
unsettled
Kp4
active
Kp5/G1
minor storm
Kp6/G2
moderate storm
Kp7/G3
strong storm
Kp8/G4
severe storm
Kp9/G5
extreme storm

What happens when I select a keogram?

Clicking or touching on any night's keogram will open a virtual planetarium which allows you to experience that night's aurora!

Where is the data from?

These keograms are generated from publicly available timelapse video from the AuroraMAX all-sky camera, run by the Auroral Imaging Group at the University of Calgary since 2010. AuroraMAX is an amazing resource for discovering the Aurora Borealis, and this provides a unique and fast way to experience years of video highlights.

Kp Index archive from the Space Weather Prediction Center at NOAA.

This visualization project is not directly affiliated with these organizations.

Get started!

Find an interesting night sky below and tap on it to time travel to that night.